Welcome changes to the Copyright Act

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Icons borrowed from ADA

While copyright reform moves at a glacial pace, it is pleasing to report that in 2017 the Australian Government introduced important changes to copyright law in the form of the Copyright Amendment (Disability Access and Other Measures) Act 2017 which came into force on Friday 22 December. The changes it brings about are the most significant to Australian copyright law in over a decade, according to the Australian Digital Alliance (ADA). The ADA report states that the Amendment:

‘…ends the antiquated concept of perpetual copyright for unpublished works, instead applying the same basic terms to all materials, regardless of whether they are published or not. It also applies flat terms to orphan works whose authors cannot be identified 70 years from when they were created or made public (this fact sheet on the changes from the Australian Libraries Copyright Committee explains what all this means).

When these laws come into effect on 1 January 2019 they will apply to all works currently protected by copyright in Australia. This means that literally millions of old unpublished works from our national collections will enter the public domain all at once, including recipes used by Captain Cook, letters written by Jane Austen and endless ephemera. Every year after that, unpublished works whose authors died 70 years earlier will also fall into the public domain, and orphan works created/made public 70 years earlier.’

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Contribute to APO for research engagement and impact

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Posting your research publications, discussion papers, data, videos and other resources to APO is a great way to find new audiences via our newsletters and Twitter posts but APO is able to value add in many other ways.

When APO hosts your content we can provide metrics on downloads and pages views. We support better citation and interoperability of data and grey literature by applying APO DOIs (digital object identifiers) which act as permanent urls back to record. DOIs are used by other systems such as university research management software, social media monitoring companies such as Altmetrics and Plum Analytics, other identifier systems such as the researchers ID system Orcid etc. so they are becoming a key part of information plumbing. Continue reading “Contribute to APO for research engagement and impact”

APO Collection policy

The following collection policy covers the management and reuse of APO metadata and full text content. It has been revised based on the standard format used by the Directory of Open Access Repositories (OpenDOAR) in order to increase the visibility and impact of repositories around the world.

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Get a DOI

What is a DOI?

A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) gives you a permanent link to your research online, allowing for consistent citation of research with no danger of dead links. DOIs greatly enhance discoverability and retrieval of content for researchers and institutions.

Thanks to an Australian National Data Service (ANDS)-funded project, APO is able to mint DOIs for research and data hosted on the APO database. Continue reading “Get a DOI”